How to Dip Dye Easter Eggs

Decorating eggs has been an Easter tradition in our family for as long as I can remember. The classic dip-dyed method is one of the easiest ways to decorate eggs.  It’s timeless and will always be the best in my book.  When I was younger we used rubber bands to make patterns, but I always had trouble with getting them to stay on, so this time I’ve gone with the simple and effective crayon drawing which has a guaranteed effect.  You can blow the eggs if you’d like them to last a long time, or simply use hard boiled eggs.

You will need

  • eggs
  • a white wax crayon
  • food dye
  • white vinegar
  • paper towel
1. Draw on each egg with the white crayon.  At this stage you’ll hardly be able to see the crayon, but don’t worry, it won’t stay this way.
2. Place a few drops of food dye into a bowl of vinegar.   One bowl for each colour.
3. Place your eggs in the bowls and roll them through the dye until the eggs are the desired colour.   You can use a spoon or wear rubber gloves if you don’t want to colour your fingers.  You’ll notice that the dye does not colour the wax from the crayon.
4.  Place your eggs on paper towel to dry.
5.  Your eggs are done!  All ready for the Easter fairy to deliver ;)
These dip dyed eggs in a bowl make a lovely Easter decoration, or if you use boiled eggs you can serve them up to your kids for lunch or even have an Easter egg and spoon race!
Is egg decorating a tradition in your house?
This post is part of an Easter series here on Frog Goose and Bear.  To see all of the Easter crafts, recipes and activities in this series, you can click on the image below.


This post was originally published on Kidspot.com.au in March 2013.


How to make eggshell fairylights


Although eggs are often associated with Easter, which does so happen to be just around the corner, these eggshell fairy lights can be used all year round for any night time celebration! Once it’s dark the hollow eggs are transformed into beautiful glowing balls of coloured light.  The affect is truly stunning.  They are pretty fragile being made of eggshells, but if you are careful they’ll last through a whole year’s worth of festivities!

You will need:

  • Eggs
  • Egg piercer
  • Bowl
  • Sewing pin
  • Coloured LED fairy lights
  • Hot glue gun

Part 1: Blowing the eggs

For this part you’ll need your eggs, an egg piercer and a bowl.
1.  Pierce a tiny hole in each end of each egg using an egg piercer (pictured above) or a sharp pointy ended knife.
2. Use the sewing pin to make the hole at the smaller end of the egg a little larger so that it will fit onto your fairy lights.
3.  Leaning over your bowl, put your mouth over the smaller hole and blow the contents of the egg  through the larger hole into the bowl.  You’ll have to blow hard!
4. Give your eggs a rinse and leave them to dry.

Part 2: Making your fairy lights

For this part, you’ll need your blown eggs, a hot glue gun and some coloured fairy lights. You’ll need to use LED lights, as they do not heat up, to prevent your eggs from cracking.
5. Place an egg over each light bulb on your fairy lights.  You may need to make the hole in your egg a little bigger with the sewing pin if it doesn’t fit.  Using your hot glue gun, place a small amount of hot glue where the hole in the egg touches the wire.
6. Hang your new eggshell fairy lights up and plug them in.  They may look like a bunch of eggs on a string (which do actually look kinda cool) but when it gets dark …..
… look what happens when you turn on the lights!  The effect is even more awesome in real life!  They certainly have the ‘wow’ factor and these lights are so festive they’ll make you want to go and organise a party straight away!
When is your next celebration?  What are you celebrating?
This post is part of the Frog Goose and Bear Easter Craft Series 2014.


Note:  Egg piercers can be found at your local kitchen or home supply store.  They make a very small hole which is perfect for blowing eggs and it means that there are very few breakages.  They are also fantastic to use when boiling eggs as they are much less likely to crack!

* This post was originally published on Kidspot.com.au in 13 March 2013. 


Easter Craft: How to make eggshell candles









Last year, I discovered the art of candle making.  Who knew it was so easy?!  I am now addicted and looking for any container I can get my hands on to fill with melted wax and transform into a candle. Old jars, fancy tea cups and even eggshells.  Nothing is safe from being filled with melted wax!
If you’d like to give eggshell candles a crack (pardon the pun), here’s how:

You will need:

  • - eggshells
  • - food dye
  • - vinegar
  • - paper towel
  • - egg carton
  • - soy candle wax
  • - candle wick with metal tab
  • - hot glue gun
  • - wooden skewers

1. Clean your eggshells in some soapy water and rinse.
2. Place a few drops of food dye into a bowl of vinegar.   One bowl for each colour.
3. Place your eggshells in the dye bath and roll them through the dye for about 30 seconds.  Keep the eggshell in the dye for longer if you want a stronger colour.  You can use a spoon if you don’t want to colour your fingers.
4. Dry your coloured eggshells on some paper towel.
5. Place dried eggshells into an egg carton.


















6. Cut a piece of wick to 10cm in length and thread it through your metal tab.
7. Secure the metal tab & wick to the bottom of eggshell using a hot glue gun.
8. Tie the pieces of wick to a wooden skewer to keep the wick out of the wax.
9. Place your soy candle wax into a pyrex  jug (or a double boiler saucepan).
10. Place jug in boiling water on stove and wait until it melts.  It will become clear when it’s ready.  Take it off the heat as soon as it has melted.
11. Pour the melted wax into the eggshells as carefully as possible.
12. Leave your eggshells to dry for a few hours and once the wax is hard you can remove the wooden skewers and trim the wick.
13. Place your new candles in some ceramic eggcups or make your own candle holders.
14. Light your candles!


















My eggshell candles are now sitting on my kitchen windowsill alongside my eggshell succulents, but they’d make a great outdoor table centrepiece on a summer evening and you could even add some insect repellent essential oils!
If you wanted to shake it up a little you could:
-  Add scent to your wax.
Melt down an old candle or old crayons to add colour to your wax.
- Just skip the whole coloured bit and use plain eggshells.  Very stylish.
What would you make into a candle?  What is your favourite candle scent?
 This post is part of a series on Easter crafts, recipes and activities here on Frog, Goose and Bear.  You can click here to see all of the other posts in the series.  Even better, if you’d like to do a guest post for this series, I’d love to hear from you!



* I purchased my candle supplies from Spotlight, but I’m sure you’d be able to find them at your local craft supply store.

* This post was originally published on Kidspot Village Voices in 16 Nov 2012.

An Easter craft: How to make an eggshell succulent garden


Usually when we eat boiled eggs for dinner (a regular easy meal at our house) the kids like to turn the egg over when they’ve finished and pretend there is a new egg to eat. The unsuspecting recipient then gets a bit of a surprise when the spoon goes right through an empty egg shell.  They think it is hilarious and the joke somehow never fails to get old.  However, this time I asked the kids to keep their shells intact as I had a different plan for the eggshells…

Taking inspiration from around the web we made our own little mini eggshell succulent garden.
To make your own you will need:
- egg shells
- egg carton
- succulent cuttings
- soil or potting mix
How to:
1. Give your eggshells a quick clean (I just rinsed mine under the tap), let them dry and pop them into the egg carton so your egg shells remain upright.  If you don’t have an egg carton on hand, an eggcup or cardboard tube cut to size would also do the job.
2. Fill your egg shells with soil until they’re about 3/4 full.
3. Insert your succulent cuttings into the soil.  Succulents are one of those amazing plants where the roots just grow when a cutting is placed into soil.
4. Gently give your new creations a light spray of water using a spray bottle.  You will only need to spray your succulents every now and then as they do not like being too wet.
The eggshell succulents look pretty cool displayed in the egg carton and would also look stylish in ceramic egg cups.  We made our own egg cups by cutting a toilet roll into three and gluing on some origami paper.  I have a bit of a thing for origami paper, but you could use paint, fabric, wool or lace to decorate if you felt so inclined.   They are now proudly displayed on our window sill above the kitchen sink.
I was lucky enough to have a good friend who grows a great variety of succulents who gave me lots of small cuttings to play with, but if you can’t find any in a backyard near you, you will have no trouble finding them at your local nursery.
Have you ever planted anything in an eggshell?
You might like to try our mini Easter terrariums in a plastic egg too

I am currently running a series on Easter crafts here on the blog, so if you have an Easter craft you’d like to share in a guest post on Frog Goose and Bear – shoot me an email coz I’d LOVE to hear from you!

http://froggooseandbear.blogspot.com.au/p/kids-craft.html

*This post was originally published on Kidspot Village Voices on 6 October 2012.

Some more egg decorating…

For some reason this year, I’ve got right into the whole easter craft thing!  We normally do one or two easter craft activities, but this year I can’t seem to stop!  It is most likely due to getting so much wonderful inspiration from fellow bloggers!


 Along with the fact that my children are getting older.  I no longer have babies, but children who are interested in, & capable (ish) of crafting along with me – with the exception of Bear.  “I’m not into craft, Mum” he often tells me.  His artwork folder at kinder is usually empty.  However, every now and then he ventures out of his ‘no craft’ box and surprises me.  

Last week when Bear and I were the only ones at home and I was preparing the MOPS craft for the week he was really keen on joining in.  It might have been about him wanting to experiment with colour & eggs, but it also might have been about spending some quality time with Mum which is sometimes hard to come by with this gentle & mild middle child who resides between two boisterous & defiant sisters.


We blew our eggs & used this simple dying technique.  We made these patterns using double sided tape (the stripes) & white crayon (the dots & words).  I saw today some gorgeous vintage lace eggs that I’d love to try next.  Egg dying is an Easter tradition in many households.  Is egg dying an Easter tradition at your house?


If you’re interested you’ll find more easter crafts over at the FGB kids craft page & even more over here on Red Ted’s Art collection of Easter crafts.


Elegant Easter Eggs

You might remember that last year there was a little Japanese fad going on at our house… and that when I came across this idea I had to give it a try.  A year on, I still have a love for Japanese origami paper.  As my recent bunting cards may attest.

 I ended up only making one egg last year, the sparkly blue one in the photos (I’d accidentally purchased glitter modpodge) and it is still in good condition a year on.*  



You can find the full instructions on how to make them over here.  
Mine were more of a slapdash kind of job, not quite as fiddly as Martha suggests, but I think they still turned out quite well.  Origami paper works well for this project because it works best with thin paper.  We might end up doing them for the MOPS craft this week.

These eggs are fun for the kids to try as well.  
Frog was very proud of this one that she & I made below!



Joining in today with Jodie, the Haby Goddess in her new Make-Grow-Thrift linky.

Do you do easter crafts?  I love any excuse really – adds to the magic maybe…

* the eggs were blown so they’ll last for a long time – as long as you don’t drop them!

P.S.  I just had to include this dodgy little photo taken a year ago of Goose & Frog blowing some eggs.  
Gorgeous kids – they grow up too fast!

MEET ‘EGG’BERT…

To make an ‘Egg’bert of your own, simply keep your egg shell from the next time you have a boiled egg for brekky and…

1. Put a moist cotton wool ball inside the empty egg shell.

2. Sprinkle some alfalfa sprout seeds* onto the moist cotton wool ball.

3. Sit the egg in an egg cup on your windowsill or benchtop & wait**.

4. Remoisten each morning & afternoon by dripping some water on to the cotton wool ball(drain out any excess water).

5. Seeds should start to sprout within a day and by 3-5 days, you should have a full head of hair!

Thanks to ‘Scratchy‘ & ‘Flappy‘ eggs are popular in this house and we now have a whole family growing on the windowsill!

To grow your own alfalfa to eat and to make your own simple alfalfa sprouting kit using a jar, a rubber band & some tulle, please check out my tutorial here. Alfalfa seeds can be purchased from your local health food store.

A little late this week in joining in with Childhood 101. I’ve also discovered Imagination Tree too! If you are after kids craft ideas. Check them out!

Or for other Kids Craft Ideas that we’ve done here at FGB, you might like to check out the ‘Kids Craft’ Page here.

* Any other type of sprout seeds would work also and probably even grass seeds. Another cool grass head activity I’d like to try with the kids is here and how cool are these little bride & groom egg shell plants.
** My kids asked me every 10 minutes for the first hour if they could check it if had grown… this is the most difficult part of the activity!!

EASY PEASY LUNCHBOX WINNERS

I’m on a quest for healthy (ish) school lunches for Goose and in particular – sandwich substitutes. So far the stand out favourite has been the ‘Mini Egg & Bacon Pies’.

This is a recipe that has been in our family for as long as I can remember. These were requested at every single birthday party without fail when we were growing up and my sisters & I have carried on that tradition.* They are always a hit and perfect to freeze and pull out for school lunches, when friends come over for lunch or when you need to bring a savoury plate. They are great warm and great cold.

MINI EGG & BACON PIES

250g shortcrust pastry
3 rashers bacon, chopped
1 tablespoon chives OR 1 onion, chopped
3 eggs
1 & 1/2 cups of milk OR cream
2 teaspoons parsley, chopped
125g cheese, grated
salt & pepper

1. Set oven to 190 C.
Fry bacon & onion in frying pan. (Or just the bacon if you are using chives)
3. Beat eggs & add all other ingredients.
4. Line a greased muffin tray with pastry rounds. I use the top of a wine glass or a scone cutter.
5. Put tablespoon or so of mixture into each one & cook for 15 mins.

* This can be made into one large pie also. Just blind bake the pastry first for approx 10 mins and cook at 180C for approx 40 mins.

Coming close second in the lunchbox stakes are Zucchini & Ricotta Muffinsstay tuned later this week for the recipe. I am keen to try these, these & these which I think could be winners also.

What are your lunchbox winners?

If you’ve got a healthy lunchbox recipe, whether sweet or savoury, that you’ve already posted about – please link it up below. Or you could always write a new post – just to link it up here! It would be great to have a resource of lunchbox ideas, that are tried and true by bloggers & their kids, that we could all go to with just one click!



*With the exception of the Japanese party & the Pink Party as it just didn’t fit the theme ;)

AT MY HOUSE…

I am breaking the rules and entering not one but TWO times in Lou’s At my House! Mainly because my husband is home today so I have more time to indulge – a rarity in itself – and because she broke the rules on my blog ;-).

Doing a little baking for my monthly craft night on tonight. I never really actually have time for baking, but I make time for it because I enjoy it – it is an expression of creativity that I can do with kids (albeit a little slower) and gives me a sense of satisfaction quite different to that of having a clean house (the other option for the use of my time today). The washing remains unfolded, etc, etc. but I think it’s become important as I try and bring myself back.

Something else that gives me a huge sense of satisfaction
(and I need those moments to save my sanity amongst the mundane, repetitive tasks of motherhood)
is my vege garden (another kid friendly pastime) and nothing makes me more proud at the moment than baking using ingredients I have grown in my very own garden! In this case eggs, lemons and rhubarb.


A very, very delicious recipe, that I was given by my wonderful foodie friend Kate, containing sour cream, lemon rind and salt….. intrigued?

RHUBARB & CINNAMON CAKE

60g butter
380g dark brown sugar
2 eggs
1 tspn vanilla extract
300g plain flour
250ml sour cream
1 tspn bicarb soda
1 tspn salt
1 tspn cinnamon
500g rhubarb (sliced into 2cm pieces)
grated lemon rind

topping :
80g dark brown sugar
1 tspn cinnamon

1. beat butter with brown sugar
2. add eggs & vanilla.
3. stir in sifted flour, bicarb soda, salt & cinnamon.
4. add rhubarb, lemon rind & sour cream.
5. stir with wooden spoon.
6. grease & line a round 22cm cake tin.
7. pour in mixture & sprinkle with topping.
8. Bake in preheated oven (180c) for 1 – 1&1/4 hours.


I have just found out that a lovely friend has started a new blog! Apart from the fact that she has written some very touching things about me, her blog is just gorgeous!! Fun, honest, down to earth, beautifully written and thought provoking. I am very much looking forward to being inspired by it on a regular basis and I think you will too, why not head on over to Loose Change


MORE BACKYARD CAPERS

A blog post celebrating the beauty in the everyday. I have found this to be one of the most therapeutic things about blogging.

Enjoying a bit of sunshine out in the backyard today. Hanging the washing out on the line.

Enjoying some favourite regular rituals of
feeding the chickens.

collecting the eggs

shooing the chickens away from the vegies

and giving them a good talking to when they invade the sandpit!


What everyday rituals do you have?

Mind you, it doesn’t always happen so peacefully and many days have me racing to get the washing on and off the line so we can go out, or hanging the clothes all through the house over the ducted heating vents because it is too wet outside and children pulling them off the vent onto dirty floors well in need of a mop. This is why it is so therapeutic for me to see that sometimes it does work.

A quote I found the other day in The Divided Heart reminded me of why I blog

“If you want to really hear yourself, write. Because you will hear.”

It is important for me as I get bogged down in the everyday to find the snippets of sunshine amongst the rest. I can feel like everything is going into utter chaos, but I take one look at my blog and see all was well and I have created something (apart from a messy house) for at least 5 mins of the day.

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